Sunday, June 8, 2014

A Home in Charleston

I am going to write about the making of a new home. We bought a home (condo) in Charleston last month. Charleston is our happy place. We have no idea what we will do with this. I love that city and really have since I left there in 19685. I've been able to live without it, obviously, but more recently, have longed to return. Happily, Lee gets it, too. Walking, green year round, a palm tree in front of our home, antiques, 18th and 19th Century architecture, a remarkable food culture and people who love to be helpful.

Icy, cold winter here has gotten the better of me. I no longer want to live forever in a place I have to remove my shoes at the door. Still this is a terribly complicated matter. We ADORE our friends in Minneapolis. I LOVE my work and my clients and this is where my work is. So, I imagine doing something flexible and creative and seamless when it comes to serving my clients. And, still, I don't know exactly how that will work. But, I've done it before when I lived half time in NYC. We are keeping our beautiful 510 apartment as the home base for my business. Mostly I am hoping and expecting to enrich my life and my work by spending time in Charleston. For now, we'll rent the condo on VRBO except for the times we'll want to be there.

******Just this week I purchased 4 pieces of furniture from Charleston for clients in Minneapolis and arranged to have them shipped here. Antiques ROCK in Charleston!*******

A few snips and snaps:

1860 Greek Revival - the first floor is our home - with that GREAT PIAZZA
( Charleston's name for the more pedantic "porch". )

Image with the blow up mattress and nothing else. Original heart pine floors c. 1860 and fireplace.

I'll be painting the walls - oh, I am such a just want it white gal! (Though this white will be
Ben Moore Navajo White to match the existing trim.) Again, the gorgeous heart pine floors, another fireplace in the Living Room (this would have been the original dining room probably. 12 foot ceilings! Woo hoo!

Piazza with great view of Palmetto tree and church steeple.
This is furniture the owner's left for us - perfectly useful for now!

French doors in both of the main rooms onto the piazza. Crazy beautiful indoor - outdoor living.

This is the in process bedroom after some the antiques were delivered and before
room is painted...But after I was trying out the colors on the walls!

Another view of the Bedroom - with great old vintage wingback chairs I found
in Charleston in musty green leather. 





Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Until next time, Pacific

What to say? Lee will argue that you can't beat it for beauty. I'm not going there.
It is spectacular.
And I am so grateful for the time with Lee, Collin, Annie, Landon and Jed.
Just a big old bunch of very cool chill people. What I noticed? There wasn't a minute of complaining in 5 days.

Lee watching the sunset (with gin and tonic in right hand, btw.)

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Micro-View

So, it is so rare that I have time to think....reflect...observe....but I have that here. Today, instead of seeing Oregon in a "MACRO" big picture kind of way, I took some time to see the "MICRO" and the beauty of the forces of life and the universe are really quite amazing. I went out this morning with my camera just to "see" into the world in which I am living these few days. Here are a few of the things I saw today. With emphasis on the seeing of it all.

So, as I walked through the little path to the beach, instead of seeing the whole macro path, I looked at each and every flower that was on the path to the beach. And this is what I saw....

And, in the end...the thesis of this post is what a spectacle of beauty, life and miracle this world is.

All of these flowers are on one short little path to the beach.































Below, what I "saw" on the beach.....and oh so my color palette!








































Saturday, May 24, 2014

East Coast - West Coast

I don't think it has ever happened to me that I have been on both East and West coasts in one week until this one. I left Charleston on Tuesday and flew to Portland on Friday, landing on the beach here today (Saturday.) Pretty darn good and not sure how I landed this lucky life.

Charleston is a post of its own - one I need some time to write - but this, this beach house on the Pacific (yep, ON the Pacific) with Collin and Annie (son and daughter-in-law of our dreams), Landon (son) and Landon's uber chill awesome friend Jed (Mr. Google starting his sabbatical with us here on the Pacific) is just fireworks of bliss for us. Especially Lee. I've never seen him so full of gratitude. I think there is something called the Stendahl effect that best describes it.

So, not a West Coast kind of gal, I had not made Portland and the coast a priority, but when it became clear that Collin and Annie (who live in Eugene and work a bit in Portland) were feeling dismissed (and rightly so) we bought our tickets and said, "Show us what you got."

Well, they rose to the occasion, got a beach house in Arch Cape (4 miles south of Cannon Beach and 8 miles north of Manzanita), bought a car full of groceries, gin, wine, Prosecco, raw cheese, gluten free crackers and picked fresh arugula and lettuce from their garden and packed the car.

After 24 hours in Portland and a divine Peruvian mean at Andina, then a hearty brunch at Tasty and Sons, we headed to the beach. I couldn't have imagined such a perfect place. It's clean! Beachy places can be so skanky dirty, ya know. This is so fresh, modernish, fireplace, awesome beyond explanation deck, and a really good kitchen.

But mostly, what's better than a husband rockin out to Dylan and Van Morrison and tearing up at the sunset sitting next to his sons. Big old cotton candy clouds of joy.

So, here are a few images from my day in Portland and my landing at the beach.

Thanks, pals Nick and Wendy Brown for encouraging this East coast girl to head West. www.brownink.com. Just fyi - there is, at this moment, a Bob Dylan sing-along on the deck. Need to go!

A front porch in Portland.

Darling "pop up" restaurant - getting ready for Saturday brunch.

This is a light bulb store window. Craziest damn thing.

This is another window at the light bulb store.

This is a slightly embarrassing store selling salt, chocolate, flowers and wine.
This is a store for rich people.

This is part of the "small house" movement in Portland. 

Self-explanatory.

Gorgeous - koi at the Japanese Garden.

Woven bamboo fence.

Japanese Maple and beautiful pebble garden.

Beach at Arch Cape. Oregon.

Off our deck - yep, those are Calla Lilies!
Arch Cape, Oregon.



Dylan sing along on the deck watching sunset. Really.

Monday, April 7, 2014

Design is Everywhere

Yep, even in the way a sandwich is wrapped! This one, from Goat. Sheep. Cow. in Charleston, SC. This is a shop I so wish we had in Minneapolis. I know.... there's 44 France and Surdyks....



 But, you can't beat a little shop on Church Street in Charleston for charm.







Sunday, March 9, 2014

Wisdom for the Week

I was talking to my Mom about life. She's 83 and still pretty darn cool and smart. Book club, works out at her little Senior center there in Northfield, goes to an acupuncturist and says Namaste at the end of her prayers.

Anyway we were talking about money and how great it is when you save it. Because recently I have had the idea that there are at least two things in life you NEVER REGRET.

There are probably more.

But, for sure, you don't regret these:


1.  Saving money - for the long haul or the short haul. Having for when you are 80 or having it to take a great trip or having it to buy a home or having it to buy some new clothes. Never ever have I heard someone say "I wish I hadn't saved that money."

2. Exercising - Like, again, have you ever heard anyone say - wow, what a waste of all those years of staying healthy! Never. Never. Ever. Even when it's hard, I have never thought. Wow- I wish I hadn't gone to that yoga class. Or what a dumb thing to run the lake today!


So, that's my wisdom for the week. I"m starting to feel older when I start spouting wisdom.

Anything else you'd add to the list? Bet there are some things about spending time with people you love.....

Monday, March 3, 2014

Random Ideas about Aging and Embarrassment

This happened to me today, March 3, 2014:

I have a client who recently moved into a home and wants to hire an organizer. She travels, she has 2 other homes. She has a busy life and housekeeping is not her highest priority. (God love her!) So I sent her the name of a lovely organizer I know.

The organizer wrote back:

P.S>


Sometimes clients will take my number, and be embarrassed to call. Assure her that I have seen everything, and our work is confidential. We can set a two or three hour session and move mountains!!

I wrote back to the organizer:

Lorie is my age - we no longer get embarrassed! 
We've run through all the embarrassment we carry in a lifetime by now. :-)



I had never really thought about this before I wrote this today. But I actually think it is true. It is as if life is graceful enough to give you only so much "embarrassment" in your life and then you run out and never have to worry about that again. It would be hard to embarrass me now. At 60, I have made such a wretched fool of myself over the years that I don't know what's left to worry about.

It's your life. Not someone else's. So what is there to be embarrassed about, really? Who cares if other people see things differently?

This does not excuse bad manners, however! I'm talking about feeling ashamed or embarrassed by the life we've created, lived, chosen - even when it is in the middle of looking like a train-wreck. Who knows what will rise out of the ashes? Who knows when the Phoenix will take form?

Remember, that Thoreau guy had a few good ideas:

“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music he hears, however measured or far away.” 
― Henry David Thoreau

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you've imagined.” 
― Henry David Thoreau

“Not till we are completely lost or turned around... do we begin to find ourselves.” 
― Henry David Thoreau